Electric Cars: A Rundown

March 4, 2020
Electric Cars: A Rundown

Electric cars are here. With companies like Tesla running the gambit within the US, many companies have turned out their first generation in order to catch-up.

Tesla Solidifies US Electric Cars

The largest supplier of EV’s in America is none other than Tesla. With Elon Musk (developer of Pay-pal and owner of Space-X) the mogul has decided that the US needs a stronghold in the electric market. His endeavors have been crucial in bringing forth the era of electricity. With many car companies pushing out their first line of electric vehicles, Tesla has left them in the dust. The development of their electric line now stems from multiple vehicle lines as well as a limited semi truck line. This has made them a forerunner of technology as well as establishing an environmentally friendly and cost-effective approach to the electric vehicle market.

The Cost

Cost is a major factor when re-establishing the industry. In the days prior to to the Tesla series, the industry had very little success with the electric car market. This is to say that the effort wasn’t necessarily put forth on EV’s- meaning the return was expected. They were also expensive. It wasn’t until Toyota developed the first “hybrid vehicle” that consumers were able to get their hands on a relatively affordable (semi) electric car. This move increased awareness for an electric market significantly.

This is the case with Tesla’s first launch. The model S was a great vehicle to bring to the market. At approximately 60k, this vehicle boasted the expulsion of fossil fuels. Where many would have spent the money on a new SUV, they opted for a more effective vehicle that didn’t require the use of raw petrol. While the first few vehicles in the Tesla line were outside the spending point for many, the consumers who did purchase the first electric car allowed for consumer reviews which boasted positive results. This had a direct effect on the market for Tesla as their orders flourished.

Tesla Model 3 Cost

With the development of the Tesla Model 3. The industry has seen another massive influx of electric vehicles. Their baseline Model 3 starts out at approximately 40k. This might still seem out of the general public hands but after an electric vehicle tax break by the Federal Government (as well as states like California) it drops the price exponentially to $30-$33k. This has helped to promote cleaner and more environmentally effective driving methods.

This is just for the Model 3. If you are looking to go either with more space or more power, you are still looking at spending $70-$90k. But for the average consumer, the ability to own an all-electric vehicle is closer than ever.

Power and Range

Tesla once again set the bar for range and power standards. Most new Tesla’s can now get upwards of 300 miles per charge (which is almost comparable to at least my 2007 V6 Altima in terms of range). Where range had started out at 200 miles, the company has quickly adjusted for improvement. Boasting another 100 miles since its inception is nothing to joke about. This has led many other electric car manufacturers scrambling to compete in a rather difficult market set by the company.

As for power rating, another factor for many car enthusiasts, it’s hard to compete with a car that can go from 0-60 in 1.9 seconds. This is due to the lack of engine weight as well as fuel weight. Essentially, Tesla is so lightweight that engineers are finding it hard to keep it on the road at its top speed of 250 mph. Wow, this car is fast.

In terms of power, Tesla outpaces most cars in the Japanese market. In actuality, it still sets the bar as many high-end sports car manufacturers are developing the technology to match it. Now, a lot of them have, but you’re looking at a much higher rate of the cost when you’re buying an all-electric Audi or BMW.

Electric Cars Around The World

Tesla has pushed past the point of speculation and has completely sunk its teeth into the American car market. In other areas of the world like Japan and Europe, car manufacturers are releasing their first line of electric vehicles. Audi, BMW, and Volkswagen have all utilized the CCS charging system in order to promote their vehicles. This charging system is relatively new and has its majority of stations in European countries. This isn’t to say that it won’t move into the American market. With companies like Ford looking to use this method of charging for their own line of electric vehicles.

In Japan, Toyota, Honda, and Nissan have opted for a more developed and widely utilized charging system: CHAdeMO. The charging system has the majority of its roots in Europe with Japan and other Asian countries close second. It was developed as a joint effort by the three leading car companies and has the widest distribution of charging systems in the world. America has recently broken the 3000 power station number which far outnumbers Tesla.

With the limited availability of electric cars on the market prior to now, it is good to see the level of thought that has come from most large-scale automotive manufacturers from every part of the globe. With the establishment of a fully electric car market, the ability to compete is now readily available for most parties.

This Post Has One Comment

  1. You say: “As for power rating, another factor for many car enthusiasts, it’s hard to compete with a car that can go from 0-60 in 1.9 seconds. This is due to the lack of engine weight as well as fuel weight. Essentially, Tesla is so lightweight that engineers are finding it hard to keep it on the road at its top speed of 250 mph. Wow, this car is fast.”
    This is not true: Tesla cars are heavy due to their massive battery. The reason they accelerate so well is in the immediate and strong COUPLE (i.e. force at the road contact times radius of the wheel) modern electric motors can deliver when feed with modern power electronics and modern Li-ion batteries. High POWER is only necessary and delivered when the vehicle speed increases as it is proportional to the product of couple times wheel rotation frequency.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Get a FREE Quote